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Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2NHRRDl
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3AyHCUd
Youtube: https://youtu.be/ArFI83D0yUE


Not only are we talking about the reasons we got into tech, but we’re celebrating 100 episodes of Humanize IT! Our podcast has really evolved from specifically talking about how to have conversations with businesses to focusing on how to build MSP culture and learning what’s going on in this industry.

Thank you for being on this journey with us! We’re excited to see what comes in the future. But for now, let’s talk about why we’re in tech!

Both Skip and I have different stories and reasons why we ended up in IT. I am an analytical person—you might have noticed. I found computers really cool in the 80s and found a love of figuring out how things work and how things are built.

Tech fascinated me, so I got a degree in computer science. When I landed my first job, I realized that the college classes had taught me important information, but I hadn’t learned the things that I actually needed to know. Most of the stuff I know now is from doing hands-on work.

Overtime, I learned that I didn’t like computers as much as I like problem-solving and strategy. I’m happiest when I can lead others and strategize solutions. But, I got here because of the IT industry and working on computers.

Skip’s decision came down to his personality and love of problem solving. In the 90s, if something technical wasn’t working, you just had to figure it out, and that resonated with him. He’s not one for a step-by-step approach. He just wants a starting point and an ability to figure it out in his own way.

Skip got an electronics degree because that was the closest thing they had to anything technical. It wasn’t exactly what he was looking for, but he learned more while working in a computer store.

Overall, Skip loved the newness of technology. It was exciting to work with something brand new and figure out how it works. Eventually, the newness wears off, but that excitement sparked an interest for him.

The thing about tech positions is no one really knows what you do fully—especially back when the tech was new. You have to be able to pat yourself on the back when stuff goes well, because no one else will probably understand the gravity of the work that you are doing.

With that being said, if you own a business, you should let the IT people be the heroes. They never get that kind of attention, and knowing that they are valuable will make their work so much more rewarding!

As an IT person, you might go underappreciated, but we get to solve problems and that is the exiting thing. Look how far technology has come! Look at all the things that we’ve done and built as a tech community. We all have our own parts in this and it’s really cool.

Here’s to 100 episodes, and here’s to the next 100!

Adam Walter

Written by Adam Walter

Adam has witnessed too many bad QBRs, technology conversations with executives, boring presentations and lengthy quotations. He felt that this is a major obstacle for small businesses to adopt great technologies. He started his own vCIO practice and has grown it into a very lucrative business in a short amount of time focusing only on vCIO offerings to small businesses. He’s been training and crafting materials for MSPs around the world to unlock the potential for MSPs to become business partners. He started his own vCIO practice and has grown to a very lucrative business in a short amount of time focusing only offering vCIO offerings to small businesses. He had been training and crafting materials for MSPs around the world to unlock the potential for MSPs to become business partners.