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In your job, you most likely assume that you’re doing well. Why wouldn’t you? But, if most people think they’re performing well, how do we actually gauge that and test performance? It’s really easy to talk about what makes a good MSP, and that’s generally what we like to focus on. This is a touchy subject, but one that can really benefit you in your pursuit to be a great MSP. So, let’s get started with how to see if you are a good or bad MSP!

The first thing to look at within your MSP is client retention. If your clients are only staying with you because of an iron-clad agreement, then you may have a problem. If you’re only keeping clients because you’re the cheapest bid in town, that is also a red flag. You should be offering a value to your clients that would make them want to stay with you, no matter what. Client retention should not come from force or a constant effort on your part to convince them to stay.

If you can provide an easy out for your clients and they choose to stay, then you’re doing well. We always stress conversations with your clients, and this is a great way to talk about your value and what you provide for them. You shouldn’t have to beg them to stay!

The next thing you should dive into is whether you are continuously improving. If you’re not growing, you’re dying. Essentially, continuous improvement is the cornerstone of what makes you a good MSP. Do you know if you are operating better than you were last year? Do you have the metrics to analyze to see that growth? If you haven’t improved or don’t have ways to track data, then you’re a bad MSP.

If you answered no to the following questions, it probably doesn’t feel like you’re doing badly. Generally, a lack of improvement happens from ignorance or pride. The best thing to do is identify what could be improved within your organization. It doesn’t have to be monumental changes—just small steps that will help you grow in the long run.

The third and final metric is whether your clients are in your lane. Basically, are your clients looking for the type of MSP that you are providing when looking at both services and culture.

People are always looking for different things, and there are a ton of options for MSPs. The thing to look at is what you are providing your clients. Do those services line up with what your client truly needs? If so, great! But, if not, it is time to refer them to another MSP that will align with them better.

Let’s say you work really well with schools, and that is your niche. Almost all of your clients come to you knowing that and looking for high-quality services that might cost a bit more but will align with the education field. If a hospital comes to you looking for the cheapest option, chances are they are not going to be a good fit for you. As a good MSP, you would refer them to another agency that will be able to serve them best.

Use metrics—customer retention, continuous improvement and whether you align with your clients—to test whether you’re a good MSP. If you aren’t, then it’s not too late to improve in each of these areas! If you are doing well, then maximize those skills!

Adam Walter

Written by Adam Walter

Adam has witnessed too many bad QBRs, technology conversations with executives, boring presentations and lengthy quotations. He felt that this is a major obstacle for small businesses to adopt great technologies. He started his own vCIO practice and has grown it into a very lucrative business in a short amount of time focusing only on vCIO offerings to small businesses. He’s been training and crafting materials for MSPs around the world to unlock the potential for MSPs to become business partners. He started his own vCIO practice and has grown to a very lucrative business in a short amount of time focusing only offering vCIO offerings to small businesses. He had been training and crafting materials for MSPs around the world to unlock the potential for MSPs to become business partners.